Steven E. Fitch MBA

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Why Outsource IT Services?

This is the single most asked question. Unfortunately, there are no simple answers. Every business has its own needs when it comes to computer networks. There ARE a few questions that you can ask about your organization. Your answers to these questions will lead you to a decision:

  1. Does my network ever have problems that my staff cannot fix?
  2. Is my network necessary to the profitability of my business?
  3. When a problem occurs does my company lose money until it is resolved?
  4. Can I afford to hire a full time IT person to maintain my network?
  5. Would it be worth my time and money to invest in preventative maintenance?
  6. Could your company survive if you lost all your network data permanently?

Like most technology, computer networks are a complicated tool, to work at their peak efficiency they need to be maintained. Many companies adopt the "if it isn't broke, why fix it?" philosophy. For those companies, after the installation, their computer network is never touched again, until it stops functioning properly. Unfortunately, sometimes that's just too late. Computer IT companies regularly get calls from panicked business owners whose networks have just crashed. After diagnosing the problem, sometimes the data is unrecoverable. Unrecoverable data is just that, UNRECOVERABLE. Regardless of how much money business owners are willing to pay they are never going to get their financial, customer, or inventory information back, ever. Starting from scratch is a terrifying prospect.

In today's technical marketplace, trained IT professionals are out of reach for most small to mid size companies. These companies are flying without a net. Can you afford this gamble?

The choices available to these companies are simple:

  • Let the employee that "knows about computers" do the work.
  • Hire a full time IT Professional to maintain your system.
  • Call for emergency service when your system is down to schedule a repair.
  • Don't do anything and maybe the problem will go away by itself.
  • Contract with an established service provider to BE your IT professionals

By contracting with a service provider, you are essentially hiring a team of fully certified IS Professionals to maintain your network. Similar to a full time employee, your service provider will become a proactive part of your network system. PROACTIVE is the key. 99% of fatal network errors could be easily avoided if caught and treated early. Calling a company to fix your problem may get you back up and running today, but what about tomorrow? Be sure that your company of choice staffs a team of multiple, certified engineers and technicians. Hiring a company that sends a high school senior who "Knows about computers" is a tremendous waste of your company's money. Choose a company who is certified with the Developer of your network software and workstation operating system. Don't settle for anything less than an MCSE or CNE certified engineer.

Your company's data is a valuable commodity that should be protected. Professional advanced system planning is the key to a smoothly running system with plenty of room for growth.

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NOTE: None of these suggestions and/or product names where endorsed by the manufacturer listed above. The opinion expressed here is an independent suggestion to handling the above mentioned question.

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